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New Cornwall Manor CEO prepared for changes in senior care

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Cornwall, Lebanon County-based Cornwall Manor's newest CEO and president, Lee Stickler, left, will succeed Steven Hassinger, right, who has led the nonprofit retirement community for 30 years.
Cornwall, Lebanon County-based Cornwall Manor's newest CEO and president, Lee Stickler, left, will succeed Steven Hassinger, right, who has led the nonprofit retirement community for 30 years. - (Photo / )

The newest CEO of Cornwall Manor is confident in the nonprofit retirement community's adaptability in the face of problems plaguing senior care organizations in Pennsylvania.

A saturated market, changes in health care delivery and a lack of employees are all significant problems for operators of senior care organizations. Lee Stickler, Cornwall Manor’s next president and CEO, said the key to facing them at Cornwall will be knowing where the nonprofit has succeeded and what it can learn from the greater health care landscape.

Stickler is set to replace Cornwall’s current president and CEO, Steven Hassinger, who will be leaving the senior community March 1 after 40 years. As the nonprofit’s leader, Hassinger oversaw numerous projects, including construction of a new apartment building, three neighborhoods of new homes and a new health center, as well as renovations to the nonprofit’s community center.

 “Steve has done a fantastic job helping create our strategic vision and leading the community during his time here, and I am honored to follow in his footsteps,” said Stickler, who has worked for Cornwall for the past 31 years and as executive vice president since last year.

Cornwall Manor operates 185 acres on two campuses one mile apart in Cornwall, Lebanon County. It has six apartment buildings and numerous homes with a total of 550 residents, as well as various amenities to help seniors age in place.

The nonprofit is currently working on an additional 30 homes, with construction slated for later this year. Stickler said the senior care environment is competitive and Cornwall Manor needs to adapt to changing needs in residential senior care.

“We are seeing continual demand for independent living options, people are interested in staying in their homes as long as possible and are looking for larger units so we continually adapt to that with both our new construction and renovation,” Stickler said. “That’s driving us both in terms of how we design our new opportunities for growth and how we update existing accommodations.”

Changes in health care, such as consolidation and the shift to value-based care, could be down the road for senior living communities. Stickler said it will be important to strengthen working relationships with hospitals, insurance companies and government agencies to ensure Cornwall Manor can anticipate future changes.

“We can learn from what the hospital’s experienced in the last decade,” he said. “They’ve gone through realignments and structured these models where they take on full risk or partial risk.”

Finding employees has proven difficult for most senior organizations but Stickler said Cornwall has had low employee turnover for years. He said despite a tight labor market, the nonprofit has benefited from referrals from current employees.

“That sends a powerful message that there are folks here that have the experience and they believe that it would benefit a friend or relative to have the same experience,” he said.

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Ioannis Pashakis

Ioannis Pashakis

Ioannis Pashakis covers health care and Lancaster County. Email him at ipashakis@cpbj.com.

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