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A Conversation With: Ryan GranruthGeneral manager and COO, Lancaster Country Club

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Ryan Granruth, general manager and COO of the Lancaster Country Club
Ryan Granruth, general manager and COO of the Lancaster Country Club - (Photo / )

Ryan Granruth, 36, joined Lancaster Country Club as general manager and COO in February 2017.

He has management experience at numerous golf clubs, most recently at Baltimore Country Club.

Granruth has a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Colorado, and is currently pursuing an MBA from Villanova University.

He and his wife, Megan, and their daughters Haley and Hannah live in Conestoga Valley.

Q: How has the Lancaster Country Club benefited from hosting the 2015 U.S. Women’s Open Championship?

A: One of the underlying successes of the tournament was how the members themselves created a social hub. Not only that, but it became a bragging right for the entire community. That’s really been one of the big things that came out post-Women’s Open, the integration into the community.

Why do you think the golf course is such a popular place for professionals to conduct business?

Golf can be a high-pressure game, so you see how people react in certain situations, whether they’re competitive or not, whether they’re social or not. A lot of those social skills translate to the business world as well, whether someone’s going to be competitive in business or social and amicable. And with LCC specifically, it gives a great showcase of a great area. It’s a good thing if the club is strong because it serves as another outlet for businesses. One of the primary components that people are looking for is not only business opportunities but an area for their family, and to have a social outlet as well. The club absolutely serves that purpose, outside of the business world, outside of the chaos of everyday life. It serves as that respite to escape all of that. If somebody recruits somebody to the area, they can be great at their job, but if the family doesn’t fit into the community and doesn’t feel like they have a place, it’s not going to work out.

Golf is viewed as something of a senior sport. Do you see a generation gap in your customers and what is LCC doing to attract patrons of all ages?

There’s no doubt that at golf courses and clubs there is a definite generation gap, and that split is continuing to widen. The clubs that are successful are the ones that are able to bridge that gap, that are honoring the senior membership that brought you to the point that you are but are also attracting the next generation of participants. We have done a number of things on the golf course specifically, where we put in a new set of combo tees that’s built for our aging demographic, but also appeal to junior members that are just getting engaged in the game. They are a little bit closer to the green, it’s a little more approachable for them. The mantra that we are moving forward to is LCC really is a place for everybody, whether it’s families, singles, senior members, junior members.

Have you ever shot a hole-in-one?

I never shot a hole in one, I’ve gotten to about 4 feet away. But I will say, in miniature golf, I have shot a number of holes-in-one, so that will be my bragging point.

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