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Slideshow: Solar activity

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Mike Smith, senior astronomy educator at the North Museum of Nature and Science, wears solar eclipse glasses and cradles a Sunspotter refracting telescope, two devices for safely viewing the brilliant light of the sun. On Monday, the museum will host a solar eclipse viewing event, with family-friendly activities scheduled from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Mike Smith, senior astronomy educator at the North Museum of Nature and Science, wears solar eclipse glasses and cradles a Sunspotter refracting telescope, two devices for safely viewing the brilliant light of the sun. On Monday, the museum will host a solar eclipse viewing event, with family-friendly activities scheduled from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. - (Photo / )
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Mike Smith, senior astronomy educator at the North Museum of Nature and Science, wears solar eclipse glasses and cradles a Sunspotter refracting telescope, two devices for safely viewing the brilliant light of the sun. On Monday, the museum will host a solar eclipse viewing event, with family-friendly activities scheduled from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. - (Photo / Amy Spangler) North Museum planetarium educator Kate Wilson will provide Facebook Live coverage from Charleston, S.C., where a total solar eclipse will be visible. Pennsylvania will experience a partial eclipse, with between 70 percent and 75 percent coverage of the sun. Visitors to Lancaster's North Museum will experience maximum coverage of the sun at 2:42 p.m. - (Photo / Submitted) The North Museum of Nature and Science had sold-out out of its 1,100 solar eclipse glasses by Thursday, Aug. 17. - (Photo / Amy Spangler) Mike Smith, senior astronomy educator at the North Museum, demonstrates the use of shade 14 welder's glass to view the sun. This dense glass is the only grade of welder's glass that provides safe viewing of the sun. - (Photo / Amy Spangler) Shade 14 welder's glass is not a stock item at Praxair Inc., says Jonathan Fauth, store manager at the Lancaster welding supply store along Harrisburg Pike. All Praxair stores across the country have sold out of the dense eclipse-viewing glass. - (Photo / Amy Spangler) Many solar-eclipse enthusiasts across the country will use homemade viewing devices, such as this cereal box viewer created by North Museum staff. Monday's solar event is the first significant solar eclipse for Pennsylvania since 1994. - (Photo / Amy Spangler) The North Museum will distribute this simple pinhole device for safe eclipse viewing. The closest Pennsylvania was to experiencing a total solar eclipse since 1700, was in 1925, when 97 percent of the sun was covered by the moon. - (Photo / Amy Spangler) Ken Clark, of a member of the North American Sundial Society, will display sundials at the North Museum event. The Elizabethtown resident will demonstrate a new sundial design, created this year by a society member, which will provide accurate timekeeping during the eclipse. - (Photo / Amy Spangler) A serious hobbyist, Ken Clark has studied, made and collected sundials since 1979. Clark taught himself the math needed for sundial design and now enjoys sharing his knowledge, which he continues to expand through membership in a number of international sundial organizations. - (Photo / Amy Spangler) Dr. Scott Cranshaw, an optometrist with Wertsch Vision Associates in Lititz, says he has encouraged his patients not to attempt to view the upcoming eclipse. “There will be countless videos and photos, which will capture this event, which you can view in real time without the risk of damaging your eyes. If you decide to view the eclipse, even with approved solar filters, and experience any visual changes after doing so, you should see your eye doctor as soon as possible with your concerns.” - (Photo / Amy Spangler) It is never safe to look directly at the sun, says Dr. Scott Cranshaw. “ Looking directly at the sun, even for a short period of time, can permanently damage your eyes. This condition called solar retinopathy can even cause blindness.” - (Photo / Amy Spangler) The American Astronomical Society and the American Optometric Association have created guidelines for eye safety while viewing the upcoming eclipse. According to these groups, the only safe way to view the sun is through special-purpose solar filters that “meet international standard ISO 12312-2 requirements for safe viewing.” Regular sunglasses, polarized sunglasses or other filters, cameras, telescopes, binoculars, etc. are not safe. Many people have asked about viewing through a camera or phone - they are not approved methods of viewing the eclipse. - (Photo / Amy Spangler) The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Dickinson College in Carlisle will host a solar eclipse viewing event Monday from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on the rooftop observation deck of Tome Hall. Solar-projection devices will be set up for safe viewing of the eclipse. - (Photo / Submitted) The next total eclipse over the U.S. will occur April 8, 2024. - (Photo / Amy Spangler)

 

Central Pennsylvanians prepare to experience the Monday, August 21 solar eclipse. The partial eclipse will peak locally between 2:30 p.m. and 2:45 p.m. The next total eclipse over the U.S. will occur April 8, 2024.

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