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Industrial Resolution aims to lift Lancaster technology industry

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The Industrial Resolution team, from left, includes Jonathan Yeager, Lauren Manelius, Joe Mugavero, president and founder Joel Walker and Jacob Whetstone. This fall, the Lancaster-based technology company will relocate its headquarters and open a co-working space in the Tellus360 building, which features a user-friendly green rooftop.
The Industrial Resolution team, from left, includes Jonathan Yeager, Lauren Manelius, Joe Mugavero, president and founder Joel Walker and Jacob Whetstone. This fall, the Lancaster-based technology company will relocate its headquarters and open a co-working space in the Tellus360 building, which features a user-friendly green rooftop. - (Photo / )

Sporting T-shirts with their company's name across the front, the team members at Industrial Resolution LLC seem casual and laid back. But beyond the culture of ease in which they work is a professional crew that looks at minute details to create innovative technology with precision.

Following its role managing pieces of the digital and creative strategy for the 2015 U.S. Women's Open in Lancaster, and with a plan to open in a co-working space this fall, Industrial Resolution is hoping to revolutionize the tech industry in Lancaster County.

“We are very much a company in transition and arriving right now,” said Joel Walker, president of Industrial Resolution, a technology company in Lancaster that provides consulting and marketing services.

2015 U.S. Women's Open

The company's involvement with the Women's Open was a turning point.

“We knew that it was much larger than we could do, but we also knew it would be a life-changing experience,” Walker said.

The company bid on the project and was invited, along with six or seven other companies, to make a pitch for the job. After being up all night for five nights crafting a proposal, Industrial Resolution won the bid in early 2014.

“It was crazy,” Walker said.

The company's seven employees had 16 months to develop multiple websites, all print and Web advertising, graphic designs, logos, event posters and branding for the tournament.

Building what they refer to as an “un-agency,” Industrial Resolution worked with other local companies to provide services.

For example, Infantree, a local branding company, handled the initial branding for Industrial Resolution when the company began, and the two businesses have collaborated on multiple projects. For the Women's Open, Infantree handled the initial website design, establishing brand guidelines, and editing and designing logos.

“It feels pretty good to be a part of the team that broke many Open attendance records and brought a fantastic event to Lancaster,” said Ryan Smoker, Infantree's principal and creative director.

Wonderhead Collective, which provided the graphic design support for the event, worked out so well that company founder and creative director Jonathan Yeager decided to permanently join Industrial Resolution.

And local marketing firm Pabin Collective was initially responsible for media buys and ad placement but eventually left the "un-agency" to perform other marketing work for the tournament.

A bit of history

Industrial Resolution started in 2010, inspired by another company that fell apart during the recession. With a new team and name, the company strives to live up to its motto: to give companies an unfair technological advantage.

To do so, the company's employees are constantly challenging themselves to create new things.

One example is the 2014 ExtraOrdinary Give mobile app, which was built for the Lancaster County Community Foundation. The application is among the first of its kind designed specifically for a one-time, 24-hour event. There is discussion of making this an annual project, as well as working with a national organization to build one-day apps for events across the country. Walker declined to name the organization.

Although the company can fully execute every element of a project, it is the drive to build something that doesn't already exist that sets Industrial apart, Walker said. “I will confirm with pride that my team is unparalleled. I don't consider us to be competing with anyone locally over work.”

The company may not land every local client, but it is happiest when work stays in Lancaster, said Walker, who described the local technology community as “plugged in.” Members interact with each other frequently during tech meet-ups and conferences.

“There is serious talent in Lancaster,” Walker said.

The future

In 2014, the company saw its revenue more than double from 2010. Revenue this year reached in six months what it totaled at the end of last year.

Currently operating out of 1,000 square feet in the Griest building, the company is ready for its move to Tellus360, where it will occupy 4,000 square feet. Tellus360 is an Irish pub featuring a music venue and restaurant.

The tech-focused co-working space was a collaborative idea between Walker and Tellus360 owner Joe Devoy. They share the same vision for Lancaster: to see all businesses with the courage to be open and transparent, and to move away from what Walker described as “silo thinking.”

With a thriving tech scene in the city, Walker's goal is to surround himself and his co-workers with critical thinkers.

“To exist near each other raises the standards,” Walker said.

Editor's note: This story has been modified to correct the title of the 2015 U.S. Women's Open, to more accurately reflect the working relationship among Industrial Resolution and other local companies, and to correct that Industrial Resolution handled only parts of the digital and creative strategy for the tournament.

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Write to the Editorial Department at editorial@cpbj.com

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