Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

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Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

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Political stereotypes reinforced — or not

By - Last modified: April 29, 2013 at 9:29 AM

Back to Top Comments Email Print
Brent Burkey
Brent Burkey

There's no secret that Republicans and Democrats, when taken in aggregate, might see the world a little differently.

So when Public Policy Polling reports 58 percent of Republicans think global warming is a conspiracy while 77 percent of Democrats disagree, I yawn a bit.

When the numbers go on to show 72 percent of Democrats believe President George W. Bush intentionally misled the public on the issue of WMDs in Iraq — while 73 of Republicans do not — I start to wonder why they wasted money on a poll.

But then, things get weird. And fun.

Did you know, for example, that 15 percent of Democrats believe a secretive power elite is out to rule the entire world, but slightly more than a third of Republicans and independents buy into this New World Order threat?

I guess the general fear of big government can have legs into the extreme.

But my personal favorite, and the people I'd like to meet out of sheer curiosity: Apparently 6 percent of Democrats think President Barack Obama is the Anti-Christ.

Yes, Democrats. Yes, President Obama. Yes, Anti-Christ.

I mean, it is lower than the 20 percent of Republicans, but still.

The takeaway? Political stereotypes really do go only so far.

Brent Burkey covers retail, tourism, and Lebanon and York counties. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at brentb@centralpennbusiness.com. You can also follow him on Twitter, @brentburkey.

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