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Last week's question: Are there parts of your business you prefer to do face-to-face with clients?

Yes — 93 percent

No — 7 percent

From our Facebook page:

 

Building and maintaining productive client and partner relationships is key to sustainable business growth. Most if not all of our key client and partner meetings are done face to face, as this is the most effective way of establishing trust, which is the foundation of a long term business relationship.

—717 Studios, LLC

 

I believe most businesses have lost site of the art of face to face contact in this ever changing social media crazy society.

 

There’s a real hunger amongst a the consumer base, no matter the industry, for more consumerism. To achieve that end, businesses must understand you achieve this by human contact and interaction. Not tweets or social media postings.

 

Of the clients I’ve interacted w, the common thread is that they wish they had more “face time.” I can only assume that in a global sense, and not pointed at any one type of industry, they’ve not received enough of it.

 

I see great value add from utilizing all of your points of contact and maximizing your market presence, but from a pure consumer standpoint we must get back to basics to create a market edge.

—Bob Newton

 

I personally think all banks have lost the ability to provide gave to face service. I have given up on them and am in the process of switching to all online banking, which seems to have better service than the face at the counter.

—Jennifer Hitchcock

 

Relationships are so important to our business - we find building relationships in person is a great way to start the relationship. Sometimes those are one-on-one meetings, other times it is company-wide trainings. It also gives us a better idea of the overall picture of the company and people we are working with if we can meet people. In addition, in-person interactions help all of their company employees put a face to our company as we build trust with them. Electronic communication is also vitally important and great to use as follow-up, but nothing beats an in-person good ‘ol fashioned handshake and chit chat!:)

—Amerigreen

 

From our LinkedIn group:

 

Great question: I typically like the face to face if I feel like the content of the prospective conversation could involve anything that could be construed as negative (Example: Pricing Change). Also, I will base my decision partially on the size of the account. If the customer has established him/herself as a repetitive, higher volume customer, that offers a lot of room for growth, I may be quicker to schedule an appointment to meet with them face to face.

 

The only other time I would press for a face to face is if clarity is needed that can’t be communicated in any other way.

—Ervin Miller

 

When working on a new project, in an area where people are not as familiar with your project or your company, it is best to go in person...if you can. Since calling on the phone is more of a “hit or miss” opportunity to get the full scope of your message out there, a personal visit can accomplish much more. You can guage the receptiveness of the prospect to your proposal and even see things at their bsuiness that they should be promoting.

—MaryAnn Hoffman

 

During a Lease signing, I believe that in-person being face-to-face is essential for achieving clarity and understanding needed for those mutual elements of trust and credibility thereby providing the tenant and the landlord with a gret beginning confidence in developing and building good rapport in the tenant-landlord business relationship. Face-to-Face provides that instantaneous interaction that allows each person to understand the other’s tone, inflection, and emotions that are established with the spoken words during questions or clarifications.

—Tracey Scheitrum

 

As we all struggle to manage time with daily tasks we cannot forget the importance of face to face meetings with clients. Building rapport with a client is still a large portion of influence in making a sale and retaining clientele. Obviously it is easy to reach out by email or phone for quick answers to a question or a daily thought but don’t discount the impact and personalized feeling a F2F meeting allows.

—Karen Whitaker-Garlinger

This week's question:

Is your company’s social media presence benefitting your business? Tell us how.

To answer, visit www.CPBJnow.com.

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