follow us:Google+FacebookLinkedInTwitterVimeoRSS Feeds

advertisement

PASSHE chancellor accepts new job in Washington

- Last modified: December 20, 2012 at 4:42 PM

Back to Top Comments Email Print

The Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education announced today that its chancellor, John C. Cavanaugh, will leave at the end of February to lead the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area.

Cavanaugh has led PASSHE since 2008. Prior to that he served as president of the University of West Florida in Pensacola from 2002 to 2008, and he and was provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington from 1999 to 2002.

Guido M. Pichini, chairman of PASSHE's board of governors, said the board is sorry to see Cavanaugh leave and that the system has benefitted "from his efforts to bring new ideas and high standards to all we do."

"The Board, Office of the Chancellor staff and our university presidents remain committed to our major initiatives, none more important than completing our final collective bargaining agreement with our faculty, preparing for the upcoming legislative session and our appropriations hearings in March and ensuring our students have every opportunity for success in their academic work and their careers," Pichini said.

Under the board's succession plan, PASSHE executive vice chancellor Peter H. Garland will serve as acting chancellor upon Cavanaugh's departure.

Garland has held several senior-level leadership positions with PASSHE since first being appointed executive associate to the chancellor in January 2002. He was named to his current position, in which he serves as PASSHE's chief operating officer, in 2006.

Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area has 12 universities and two colleges and serves 155,000 students.

advertisement

Comments


Be the first to comment.



Please note: All comments will be reviewed and may take up to 24 hours to appear on the site.

Post Comment
     View Comment Policy
advertisement
  
  
advertisement
  
  
advertisement
Back to Top