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Consultant: State tech spending tops $2.2B next budget

By - Last modified: May 14, 2012 at 12:09 PM

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The state government could spend about $2.2 billion on technology initiatives in Gov. Tom Corbett’s proposed 2012-13 budget, but even as that number grows slightly, some business-related initiatives will see cutbacks, according to a Philadelphia-based consulting firm’s analysis.

State spending on tech initiatives has grown nearly 38 percent over the past five years, according to analysis from pjmathison, a technology and business consulting firm. The state spent about $1.6 billion on tech initiatives in fiscal year 2008 and it spent about $2.1 billion in fiscal year 2011. Pjmathison did not have estimates on total 2012 tech spending.

As for Corbett’s proposed $27 billion budget, some programs important to business will see cuts while others see increases. Here are highlights of the pjmathison report:

• $500,000 for broadband outreach and aggregation fund, a 72 percent slash in allocation for the program that expands broadband Internet access to rural parts of the state.

• $23 million, a 33 percent cut, to Ben Franklin Technology Development Authority, which funds the Ben Franklin Technology Partners to help tech and manufacturing companies grow.

• $29.1 million to Department of Banking, a nearly $8 million increase.

• $3.35 million for the Department of Agriculture, down from $4.9 million this year.

• A $1 million cut to the Department of Community and Economic Development for tourism marketing for a total of $3 million.

Jim T. Ryan

Jim T. Ryan

Jim T. Ryan covers Cumberland County, manufacturing, distribution, transportation and logistics. Have a tip or question for him? Email him at jimr@cpbj.com. Follow him on Twitter, @JimTRyanCPBJ.

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